Is Nehru really a Kashmiri expert?

Relations between India and Pakistan

Summary

The legacy of division burdens both countries. Pakistan has fought and lost several wars against India, including the first conventional war among nuclear powers. Terrorist attacks on India by Pakistani non-governmental organizations followed. But there were also approaches to cooperation within the framework of the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation. The secession of Bangladesh created a new balance of power. However, Pakistan does not recognize the regional hegemony of India.

Abstract

The heritage of partition burdens both countries. Pakistan has waged and lost several wars against India, among them the first conventional war among nuclear powers. Subsequently there were terrorist attacks by non-state Pakistani forces on India. But there were also attempts at cooperation in the South Asian Association of Regional Cooperation. The secession of Bangladesh created a new balance of power, however, Pakistan does not recognize the regional hegemony of India.

Notes

  1. 1.

    In this article, contrary to the ZfAS standard, the masculine grammatical form is used for personal nouns. The author includes both male and female persons.

  2. 2.

    Nehru also held the post of foreign minister.

  3. 3.

    Today's India consisted of British-Indian provinces and princely states, each of which was under British rule (so-called pararamountcy). This supremacy ceased with the independence of India. In this way these states each became independent. The Balkans plan continued to apply to them. But since they were not viable in isolation, they joined India.

  4. 4.

    Mahatma Gandhi held no formal office in the Indian National Congress at this time. But he held public prayer meetings, in which he also made political statements that shaped popular opinion.

  5. 5.

    Personal communication from Ali Osman Qasmi to the author, email dated May 22, 2018.

literature

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 330, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany

    Prof. Dr. Dietmar Rothermund

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Prof. Dr. Dietmar Rothermund.

About this article

Cite this article

Rothermund, D. Relations between India and Pakistan. Z Foreign security policy11, 621-631 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12399-018-0735-4

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keywords

  • India
  • Pakistan
  • Nuclear armament
  • terrorist attacks
  • Regional cooperation

Keywords

  • India
  • Pakistan
  • Nuclear armament
  • Terror attacks
  • Regional cooperation